The Wild Nation is an attempt to throw light on the colossal beauty of India's wilderness. Every month, we curate photographs from our community, of a specific region, showcasing its unique landscape, flora and fauna.

We are kicking things off with Corbett! Established in 1936, Jim Corbett National Park is India’s first national park. Nestled between the outer foothills of the Himalayas, the Shivalik Hills, and the north of the Indo-Gangetic Plain in the Terai region, it is home to the Asiatic Elephant, Golden Mahseer, Gharial, Bengal Tiger and so much more. 

The Ramganga river flows from east to west within the park, for around 40km, and is the most precious water resource of Corbett. A major tributary of River Ganga, Ramganga is a snow and rainwater-fed river that originates in the Himalayan region. The park was even briefly named after the river from 1954 - 57, before the name was changed to Corbett.

A big shoutout to everyone who contributed to the #CorbettInFocus chapter of #TheWildNation. We hope that the photo feature does justice to this gorgeous landscape and that it inspires those of us who haven’t had the opportunity to visit the tigers and elephants of this famed park.

To plan your trip to the Dhikala zone, here is a handy travel guide.


Anil Atur

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Elephants live in close-knit family units, and their herds include adult females and their calves. The oldest and largest among them is the matriarch who leads the herd. The matriarch plays a critical role in the life of the other females, and herds travel together looking for food and water. 

Swaroop Singha Roy

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Elephants love to spend time in the water and use their trunk as a snorkel to breathe when they are swimming. Did you know that elephants can feed up to 16 hours a day consuming as much as 600 pounds of food and 25-50 gallons of water? 

Upamanyu Chakraborty

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Elephant calves spend their first few months close to their mother. They turn to their mothers not just for nutrition but also to learn survival skills. Until the age of three years, calves are highly dependent on the adults in their herd.

Trikansh Sharma

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Female tigers usually give birth to a litter of about three to four cubs. Within a litter, a dominant sibling dictates when the cubs play, eat or sleep. This individual continues to be dominant till the cubs leave their mother and go on to lead independent lives.

Mainak Ray

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On a late winter afternoon, the resident tigress calmly crosses the Ramganga river under the ever-vigilant watch of a herd of Sambar deer. The deer had just escaped a hunting attempt. They live to see another day!

Ashwin Kumar

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Black Storks reside in mixed forests where they generally tend to build their nests on trees or within cliffs. They are also long-distance migrants with the Asian populations spending winters in the Indian subcontinent.

Samyak Kaninde

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Smooth-coated Otters are designated as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. They are found  near large water bodies like rivers, where they rest on sandy riverbanks and make dens among boulders and tree roots. They face threats such as habitat loss, pollution of wetlands and poaching for illegal wildlife trade. 

Shubhankar Dey

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Gharials belong to the reptile family that also consists of crocodiles, alligators and caimans. They are distinguished by their long and thin snouts. In India, they are found in rivers like the Chambal, Son and Ramganga among others. The IUCN Redlist designates them as Critically Endangered.

Arpit Parekh

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Identified by their distinct black and red plumage and a white cap on the head, the White-capped Redstart is native to the Indian subcontinent. As seen in the image, the redstart is often found close to rushing mountain streams, filled with boulders.

Bhavik Thaker

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Tigers are excellent swimmers and can cover long distances in the water to hunt or move to a different part of their habitat. They also spend time in water during the hotter periods of the day.

Antarjit Singh  |  Manish Vaidya

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The two flagship species of Corbett! Photographers from around the world visit the national park in the hope of documenting the charismatic big cat and the gentle giant, in the grasslands and forests along the sinewy Ramganga river that flows through the iconic Terai landscape.

Mayuresh Hendre

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A female leopard is seen resting on a tree after her meal. Leopards are not a common sight in Corbett National Park, and they mainly occupy the hilly areas. Occasionally, they venture into the lowlands. Leopards are nocturnal animals and prefer to spend their days hidden among the trees or within caves.

Mainak Das  |  Trikansh Sharma

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Meet the birds of prey that reside in Corbett National Park. The large, brown and white Mountain Hawk-eagle (left) prefers forested areas and is mainly found in the Himalayas. The eagle feeds on small mammals, poultry, pheasants and ducks. The Brown Fish-Owl (right) is seen in lowlands and open woodlands, where it can be identified by its large ear tufts, brown upperparts and distinct yellow eyes. The fish-owl also feeds on small mammals, insects and water birds. It is known to hunt for prey in still waters.

Mangesh Desai

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Related to ferrets, badgers and weasels, Yellow-throated Martens, as the name suggests, have a distinct creamy-yellow throat patch. The colour of their coat ranges from dark brown to yellow-brown, and they have long bushy tails.

Hira Punjabi

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Scientists observe morphological features and behavioural attributes to distinguish between male and female tigers. For example, males, like the one photographed here, have longer tails compared to females. They also roam over larger territories.

Padmalakshmi Jnaneshwar

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Tigers depend on their sense of sight and hearing while hunting down prey. They stalk the prey and then attack the animal by inflicting a powerful bite to the neck or throat. They feed on a wide range of animals but prefer large-bodied animals. The chital in the background form an important prey base for the tiger. 

Rajesh Thapliyal

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A lone elephant in the iconic sal forests of Corbett National Park. When abundant food and water is available, elephants can live in nearly any habitat. Their preferred habitats are shrublands and grasslands.